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Lehigh Township News
The Lehigh Township will hold a public meeting on September 13, 2016, at 7:00 pm for the purpose of enacting proposed Ordinance 2016-4, to establish speed limits on Graystone Drive, Locust, Drive, South Locust Drive, Longacre Drive, Old Post Road, South Cottonwood Road and West Mountain View Drive. Please see legal notice. Please see ordinance.

Notice of Publice Comment Meeting location change for the Proposed Penneast Pipeline Project. Please see notice for all details.

Project update for landowers on the pipeline route. Please see notice for all details.

For project updates and public meeting information, please see notice for all details.

The City of Bethlehem will be holding an Electronics Recycling Event on September 10, 2016, from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, 345 Illick's Mill Road, Bethlehem, PA 18107. The even is open to Northampton County Residents with proof of residency. Please see flyer for items being accepted and fees.

Project update for landowers on the pipeline route. Please see notice for all details.

Whether in their backyards or high on a mountain, it’s almost certain Pennsylvanians will encounter young wildlife this time of year. While some young animals might appear to be abandoned, usually they are not. It’s likely their mothers are watching over them from somewhere nearby. So when encountering young deer, birds, raccoons or other young wildlife, the best thing people can do is leave the animals alone. “Most people want to do what they can to help wildlife, and when they see a young animal that appears to be abandoned, they want to intervene,” said Wayne Laroche, the Game Commission wildlife management director. “What they don’t realize is that, in all likelihood, they’re doing more harm than good. "Those young animals probably aren’t abandoned at all, meaning that anyone stepping in to try to help not only is taking that youngster away from its mother, but also destroying its chances to grow up as it was intended,” he said. Adult animals often leave their young while they forage for food, but they don’t go far and they do return. Wildlife also often relies on a natural defensive tactic called the “hider strategy,” where young animals will remain motionless and “hide” in surrounding cover while adults draw the attention of potential predators or other intruders away from their young. Deer employ this strategy, and fawns sometimes are assumed to be abandoned when, in fact, their mothers are nearby. The Game Commission urges Pennsylvanians to resist the urge to interfere with young wildlife or remove any wild animal from its natural setting. Such contact can be harmful to both people and wildlife. Wild animals can lose their natural fear of humans, making it difficult, even impossible, for them to ever again live normally in the wild. And anytime wildlife is handled, there’s always a risk people could contract diseases or parasites such as fleas, ticks and lice. Wildlife that becomes habituated to humans also can pose a public-safety risk. A few years ago, a yearling, six-point buck attacked and severely injured two people. The investigation into the incident revealed that a neighboring family had illegally taken the deer into their home and fed it as a fawn, and they continued to feed the deer right up until the time of the attack. It is illegal to take or possess wildlife from the wild. Under state law, the penalty for such a violation is a fine of up to $1,500 per animal. Under no circumstances will anyone who illegally takes wildlife into captivity be allowed to keep that animal, and under a working agreement with state health officials, any “high risk” rabies vector species confiscated after human contact must be euthanized and tested; it cannot be returned to the wild because the risk of spreading disease is too high. Animals infected with rabies might not show obvious symptoms, but still might be able to transmit the disease. Though any mammal might carry rabies, the rabies vector species identified in the agreement are: skunks, raccoons, foxes, bats, coyotes and groundhogs. People can get rabies from the saliva of a rabid animal if they are bitten or scratched, or if the saliva gets into the person’s eyes, mouth or a fresh wound. Only wildlife rehabilitators, who are licensed by the Game Commission, are permitted to care for injured or orphaned wildlife for the purposes of eventual release back into the wild. For those who find wildlife that truly is in need of assistance, a listing of licensed wildlife rehabilitators can be found on the Pennsylvania Association of Wildlife Rehabilitators website,PA Association of Wildlife Rehabilitators . If you are unable to identify a wildlife rehabilitator in your area, contact the Game Commission region office that serves the county in which the animal is found so that you can be referred to the appropriate licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Region office contact information can be found through the “Connect with Us” tab on the agency’s website, PA Game Commission

Mary Louise Trexler will no longer be collecting the NORTHAMPTON AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT PER CAPITA AND REAL ESTATE TAXES. Mary resigned from collecting school taxes December 31, 2015. The School District Tax Office will be collecting the taxes at their office at 2014 Laubach Avenue, Northampton. They will be sending all the necessary information with your tax bills no later than July 1, 2016. Regarding the Lehigh Township taxes, Mary will NOT have her regular office hours after June 1, 2016. Please call Mary at 610-262-6222 to set up an appointment to pay your taxes or call for any information that you may need help with. Mary will make herself available for your convenience.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has started to conduct license and rabies compliance checks throughout the state. Wardens will be in Northampton County the week of May 5 and in Lehigh County the week of May 16. Under Pennsylvania law, all dogs three months or older must be licensed by Jan. 1 of each year. The fee is $6.50 for each spayed or neutered dog and $8.50 for other dogs. Older adults and persons with disabilities may purchase a license for $4.50 for spayed or neutered dogs and $6.50 for others. Additionally, all dogs and non-feral cats (three months of age and older) must be vaccinated against rabies. Violators can be cited with a maximum fine of $300 per violation plus court costs. Licenses may be purchased through your county treasurer, by calling your county courthouse, or from a registered issuing agent. For more information, visit PA Department of Agriculture or call 717-787-3062.

Northampton County is cooperating with the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources-Bureau of Forestry in conducting a gypsy moth suppression project this spring in certain forested sections of Danielsville, Lehigh, Walnutport and Cherryville. Please see the notice for all details.

The DCNR link is for an interactive Gypsy moth spray block map. Residents may reference this map to see where spray blocks are located in the county. You may also see whether sprays are “scheduled”, “in progress” or “complete” by using the legend on the map. DCNR map link.

Please observe the newly posted Speed Limits on Cedar Drive, South Dogwood Road and South Cypress Road:

Lehigh Drive (248) to Blue Mountain Drive - 35 mph

Blue Mountain Drive to Walnut Drive - 30 mph

Walnut Drive to South Cottonwood Road - 35 mph

South Dogwood Road (Entire Length) - 35 mph

South Cypress Road (Entire Length) - 30 mph

Household Hazardous Waste Events: May 21 & October 8, 2016, 8:30-2:00, Northampton Communtiy College, Main Campus, Bethlehem Township. Click Here to see flyer for details.

All residents, please be reminded that if you have an emergency that requires an immediate response from the Police, Fire or Ambulance, call 911 or 610-317-0808 not the police department office number (*610-760-8800). *The PD number is not staffed 24 hours.

As many residents are aware, Lehigh Township participates with the First Regional Compost Authority for the disposal of yard waste. The Township’s facility is located across the street from the Maintenance Garage. Residents, at their convenience, are permitted to bring brush, hedge clippings, and leaves to the facility. The material is then transported to the First Regional Compost Facility on Weaversville Road and processed into mulch and compost which is then returned to the Township and made available to the residents for their use.

As a reminder to residents, this facility is only for the disposal of yard waste--acceptable items to be dropped off at this site are brush, hedge clippings, and leaves. Recently, there have been instances where unacceptable material, such as rock and metal have been mixed in with the yard waste. This type of material causes a significant amount of damage to the equipment that is used at the facility, resulting in expensive repairs. These costly repairs will unfortunately be eventually be passed on to all the users of the facility.

In order for the Township to continue with the unrestricted access to the site, everyone needs to be mindful of what they are bringing to the site. Please make sure the material that is brought to the site is free of rocks and stones. The facility is not meant for disposal of household waste. Your cooperation is appreciated.

PennDOT's toll-free 1-800-FIX ROAD (1-800-349-7623) hotline connects callers directly to their respective county maintenance office. Callers should be specific in describing the location of the pothole, including the State Route and section number (found on small, white signs along roadways), the direction of travel and any other useful location information. Calling 1-800-FIX ROAD will result in prompt action and a telephone follow-up if the caller leaves their name and telephone number. Customers can use the hotline number for any reason including: Animal carcass removal, brush and tree removal, shoulder and drainage concerns, signage issues, other maitenance needs, information, complaints and complaints.

Did you know that Lehigh Township is a recycling mandated community? The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) requires Lehigh Township residents and businesses to recycle glass, plastics, aluminum, newspapers and yard waste (leaves, branches, etc.).

The Municipality of Lehigh Township will accept yard waste only. All Lehigh Township residents may drop off unbagged leaves, tree branches and hedge clipplings. The tree branches must be cut into 8 foot lengths and shall not be larger than 6 inches in diameter. Grass clippings are not accepted. The drop off site is located across the street from the municipal garage. The operating hours are Monday thru Friday, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm. If you are dropping off at any other time than what is listed, please call (610) 767-6771, extension 19 and leave your name, phone number, date and time you will be at the site and items you will be dropping.

Blue recycling bins can be purchased at the Municipal Building for $7.50.

Welcome

Lehigh Township is located along the western border of Northampton County, Pennsylvania. Lehigh is bordered by the Borough of Walnutport to the west, Moore Township to the east, Lower Towamensing Township to the north and Allen and North Whitehall Townships, to the south.

Lehigh Township was surveyed in 1735 by orders of Thomas Penn. It was proposed that 6,500 acres be set aside for Native Americans, but the land became a settlement of immigrants instead. Before October 1752, when the township was officially created, the area had been called Adjacents to Allen, which probably refers to adjacent Allen Township. Although some residents wanted the name Seimsy after an early Moravian Indian covert named Seim, the county court opted for the name Lehigh Township instead. For more history please visit the Lehigh Township Historical Society.

Bryfogle Memorial Park


With a population of over 10,000 today, Lehigh Township is a thriving community for both families and business. Please feel free to browse our website and don't hesitate to contact us for further assistance.



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